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How WWE’s Gable Steveson became your favorite wrestler’s favorite wrestler

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How many 275-pound men do you know who can do a backflip?

While you’re ruminating on that seemingly trivial question, let’s take this thought exercise a step further: How many 275-pound men do you know who can backflip, capture the attention of Triple H and Ric Flair with their athletic prowess, win an Olympic gold medal and sign a multiyear deal with WWE before graduating college?

I reckon not many aside from Gable Steveson come to mind.

That’s because the tantalizing heavyweight freestyle wrestler is one-of-a-kind, a bona fide original.

“When and if I can win, put on a good show for America, that flip is coming,” Steveson teased to NBC Chicago of his signature post-victory backflip ahead of his awe-inducing run at the Tokyo Olympics in August.

In due time, the ultimate showman made good on his promise.

There’s a fine line between confidence and hubris, and Steveson walks it masterfully. The 21-year-old’s keen sense of self and his belief in his otherworldly abilities is what enabled him to cruise through the first three matches of his Olympic debut without giving up a point.

It’s a feat that’s particularly impressive when you consider one of his opponents was Taha Akgul of Turkey, the defending Olympic champion. Steveson — The University of Minnesota Gophers’ heavyweight, reigning NCAA Division I National Champion and winner of the Dan Hodge Trophy — made light work of Aiaal Lazarev of Kyrgyzstan in his opening match, taking only 2 minutes, 2 seconds to win 10-0. He followed that up with an 8-0 drubbing of Akgul before winning his semifinal match against Lkhagvagerel Munkhtur of Mongolia 5-0 to advance to the men’s freestyle 125kg wrestling final.

“He’s the best heavyweight wrestler to probably ever step foot (on the mat),” Steveson said of Akgul after their quarterfinal showdown last month. “But his time is up. I came here for business. I came here to win. … Ain’t nothing going to be given to me. I’ve got to go get it.”

And that’s exactly what he did in an incredible comeback win over Geno Petriashvili — the 2016 bronze-medalist and three-time world champion (2017-19) of Georgia — in the final.

Steveson was born in 2000, and America hadn’t won an Olympic gold medal in men’s heavyweight in his lifetime (Bruce Baumgartner, 1992). If you know his story, it’s not surprising that the Apple Valley, Minnesota, native would be the one to get it done.

That is not to say the Team USA standout’s mom set this all in motion by choosing to name her son after wrestling legend Dan Gable (Steveson’s middle name is Dan), who was a two-time national champion wrestler at Iowa State and an Olympic gold medalist in 1972.

Who am I kidding? That’s exactly what I’m saying. The whole thing felt preordained. Maybe that’s why the charismatic superstar was so fearless and brash about what he intended to do. He was born for it.

“You can see that when the lights get bright, Gable comes to perform,” he told the Associated Press. “And I think that’s number one with me. And I think that’s what people can expect with me wherever I go.”

If the wrestler choosing to address himself in the third person and the above quote gave you strong Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson vibes, you’re on the right track. The pinnacle of athletic achievement, winning an Olympic gold medal, was just the first item on a long list of aspirations for Gable — a stepping stone on the way to his ultimate goal: Becoming a WWE superstar.

It’s not presumptive to say the wrestler’s plan to use the accomplishment to springboard his WWE career was a resounding success. On Thursday, Steveson signed a NIL deal with WWE that will allow him to attend the University of Minnesota for his senior year and defend the Division I national championship at heavyweight. WWE will also set up a remote training facility for Steveson near campus where he’ll learn the finer points of in-ring work with WWE coaches.

While only time will tell if he will eventually be afforded opportunities like The Rock or Steveson’s mentor, fellow Minnesota great and WWE champion, Brock Lesnar, his ascension to superstardom feels about as certain as a post-victory backflip.

“When you’re a kid, you don’t really know how to make it to the WWE, but when I got to the University of Minnesota, I learned how Brock went about things and how to make connections,” Gable told Gopher Sports.

“My relationship with Brock has been awesome. It’s outstanding that a guy like that has noticed me and has gone out of his way to be there for me and guide me in the right direction.”

It was never a matter of if Steveson would go down the professional wrestling route, but when. Which is the same energy I’m bringing to the question of whether we will ever get to see him face off with Lesnar.

Steveson has already made a ton of noise in the professional wrestling space without ever stepping in the ring. From appearing in the crowd at NXT TakeOvers and WrestleMania to waving at Vince McMahon on Twitter (and eventually meeting up with him at SummerSlam 2021 after his Olympic victory), Gable kept his name top of mind among the WWE brass and stars alike.

Then there was the famed picture of the Team USA standout with Roman Reigns and his manager Paul Heyman.

“The picture of me, Paul (Heyman), and Roman Reigns is gonna go down as maybe one of the best wrestling photos in history,” Steveson said. “Just because the path that I’m taking with it and the path that Roman Reigns has set in stone being a champion, that’ll probably never be defeated again. The path that Paul Heyman has done for wrestling. He’s probably the greatest spokesperson. (He’s going to the) Hall of Fame.”

Steveson’s expectations for his future are larger-than-life, but why shouldn’t they be? Thus far he has been a walking, back-flipping testimonial for the benefits of doing it big.



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Olympic gold medalist Steveson signs with WWE

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Gable Steveson, the heavyweight freestyle wrestler who won a gold medal at the Olympics last month, has signed a multiyear deal with WWE, Stevenson told ESPN.

The 21-year-old signed an NIL deal with WWE that will allow him to attend University of Minnesota for his senior year and defend the Division I National Championship at heavyweight. WWE will set up a remote training facility for Steveson near campus where he’ll be able to learn the finer points of in-ring work with WWE coaches.

He’ll also have access to the WWE Performance Center in Orlando, Florida, where his brother, Bobby Steveson, currently trains. After Gable graduates in May, his multi-year talent contract with WWE begins; he’ll be a full-time performer with the company (but also appear on WWE programming during the school year.)

“I’ve been on WWE since I was really young,” said Stevenson, WWE’s first gold medalist since Kurt Angle. “I was on guys like Brock Lesnar and Paul Heyman for a very long time. So growing up watching them, me being an entertainer on the wrestling mat, it just felt like it was the right choice.”

The 6-foot-1, 265-pound Stevenson held talks with the UFC and also contemplated pursuing a career in the NFL; he was a hot commodity coming off the Olympic gold-medal win in Tokyo, a last-second victory over Geno Petriashvili that he celebrated with a backflip.

Sources told ESPN’s Marc Raimondi the UFC wanted Stevenson to gain experience on the regional MMA scene before potentially bringing him onto Dana White’s Contender Series to compete for a contract. The formula would have been similar to what the UFC did with former NFL All-Pro Greg Hardy. Stevenson said “we never talked about that so I have no clue.”

“We all saw his physical ability prior to and at the Olympics,” said Nick Khan, WWE President and Chief Revenue Officer. “What we also saw was that Gable has as much charisma as he does ability. Marketability and ability are both of great importance to us.”

“This is just the starting line and nowhere close to the finish line,” Khan added. “So our investment is based on how much we think of Gable now and how much bigger we think he can become.”

WWE has a rich history of transforming top freestyle wrestlers into main-event Superstars. Angle won a gold medal at the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta and parlayed that success into a long run as both a WWE champion and headline act. Lesnar, who like Stevenson, won the national championship at the University of Minnesota, is currently signed with WWE where he’s featured as one of the biggest stars in the company.

Stevenson calls the former UFC heavyweight champion a “great mentor to me,” and envisions a WrestleMania match against Lesnar in the not-too-distant future.

“Being able to learn how to take bumps and with the wrestling background I have right now, I think I can adapt to all of it really quick,” Stevenson said. “I think with the charisma and the confidence and the attitude that I bring to the wrestling mat, it will translate over to the WWE really fast and I feel that I can … go on screen and have a good role and know what to do perfectly.”

In the meantime, Gable will focus on the college wrestling mat, where he’ll defend his national championship while completing his studies. He grew up in Apple Valley, Minnesota, watching Triple H spit water in the air at WrestleMania as a member of D-Generation X. Now, he’ll learn the craft of a WWE Superstar, and that same man will be integral to his development.

“Gable impressed us well before he became a U.S. Olympic gold medalist,” said Paul “Triple H” Levesque, WWE EVP, Global Talent Strategy & Development. “He has all the tools to be a generational talent: a world-class athlete with size, speed, determination – and the ability to captivate an audience with his incredible charisma.

“The introduction of NIL allows us to create a more direct path from college to WWE, a benefit to athletes as well as the WWE Universe as Gable will have an immediate presence with our company while working towards earning his degree and defending his national championship. The future is bright for him in WWE.”

Stevenson said his breakthrough moment “might come sooner than you think.” And as for that all-important finishing move?

“I think I got one in mind,” he said. ” … It’s crazy how long I’ve been following them and now I’ve reached that point where I’m going to be walking out in front of WrestleManias and SummerSlams and people are going to do my signature look when I’m an old man, too.”

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Olympic gold medalist Stevenson signs with WWE

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Gable Stevenson, the heavyweight freestyle wrestler who won a gold medal at the Olympics last month, has signed a multi-year deal with WWE, Stevenson told ESPN.

The 21-year-old signed an NIL deal with WWE that will allow him to attend University of Minnesota for his senior year and defend the Division I National Championship at heavyweight. WWE will set up a remote training facility for Stevenson near campus where he’ll be able to learn the finer points of in-ring work with WWE coaches.

He’ll also have access to the WWE Performance Center in Orlando, Florida, where his brother, Bobby Stevenson, currently trains. After Gable graduates in May, his multi-year talent contract with WWE begins; he’ll be a full-time performer with the company (but also appear on WWE programming during the school year.)

“I’ve been on WWE since I was really young,” said Stevenson, WWE’s first gold medalist since Kurt Angle. “I was on guys like Brock Lesnar and Paul Heyman for a very long time. So growing up watching them, me being an entertainer on the wrestling mat, it just felt like it was the right choice.”

The 6-foot-1, 265-pound Stevenson held talks with the UFC and also contemplated pursuing a career in the NFL; he was a hot commodity coming off the Olympic gold-medal win in Tokyo, a last-second victory over Geno Petriashvili that he celebrated with a backflip.

Sources told ESPN’s Marc Raimondi the UFC wanted Stevenson to gain experience on the regional MMA scene before potentially bringing him onto Dana White’s Contender Series to compete for a contract. The formula would have been similar to what the UFC did with former NFL All-Pro Greg Hardy. Stevenson said “we never talked about that so I have no clue.”

“We all saw his physical ability prior to and at the Olympics,” said Nick Khan, WWE President and Chief Revenue Officer. “What we also saw was that Gable has as much charisma as he does ability. Marketability and ability are both of great importance to us.”

“This is just the starting line and nowhere close to the finish line,” Khan added. “So our investment is based on how much we think of Gable now and how much bigger we think he can become.”

WWE has a rich history of transforming top freestyle wrestlers into main-event Superstars. Angle won a gold medal at the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta and parlayed that success into a long run as both a WWE champion and headline act. Lesnar, who like Stevenson, won the national championship at the University of Minnesota, is currently signed with WWE where he’s featured as one of the biggest stars in the company.

Stevenson calls the former UFC heavyweight champion a “great mentor to me,” and envisions a WrestleMania match against Lesnar in the not-too-distant future.

“Being able to learn how to take bumps and with the wrestling background I have right now, I think I can adapt to all of it really quick,” Stevenson said. “I think with the charisma and the confidence and the attitude that I bring to the wrestling mat, it will translate over to the WWE really fast and I feel that I can … go on screen and have a good role and know what to do perfectly.”

In the meantime, Gable will focus on the college wrestling mat, where he’ll defend his national championship while completing his studies. He grew up in Apple Valley, Minnesota, watching Triple H spit water in the air at WrestleMania as a member of D-Generation X. Now, he’ll learn the craft of a WWE Superstar, and that same man will be integral to his development.

“Gable impressed us well before he became a U.S. Olympic gold medalist,” said Paul “Triple H” Levesque, WWE EVP, Global Talent Strategy & Development. “He has all the tools to be a generational talent: a world-class athlete with size, speed, determination – and the ability to captivate an audience with his incredible charisma.

“The introduction of NIL allows us to create a more direct path from college to WWE, a benefit to athletes as well as the WWE Universe as Gable will have an immediate presence with our company while working towards earning his degree and defending his national championship. The future is bright for him in WWE.”

Stevenson said his breakthrough moment “might come sooner than you think.” And as for that all-important finishing move?

“I think I got one in mind,” he said. ” … It’s crazy how long I’ve been following them and now I’ve reached that point where I’m going to be walking out in front of WrestleManias and SummerSlams and people are going to do my signature look when I’m an old man, too.”

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Olympic gold medalist Caeleb Dressel’s dog shows off ridiculous speed in 25-meter swim

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Like father, like … dog?

We all know Caeleb Dressel is an otherworldly swimmer. If you somehow missed the whole “he won five gold medals in the pool at the Tokyo Olympics” thing, you’ll just have to take our word for it. But we’ve undoubtedly been sleeping on his four-legged companion.

Dressel often speaks about his beloved black labrador, Jane. After one of his copious gold-medal winning performances (slight flex), the swimmer explained that he couldn’t wait to be reunited with his furry friend. But he failed to mention that she can turn on the jets in the pool just like her dear, old dog dad.

In a video posted to his Instagram account, Dressel revealed that Jane not only has excellent starting form off the block, but can MOVE.

Did you see that impeccable starting technique? She had her paws tucked under the lip and all. They don’t teach that at doggy daycare.

Even fellow Team USA swimmer, Bobby Finke — who won the gold in the 800m and 1500m freestyle in Tokyo — conceded, “Start is still better than mine” in the comments section.

Somebody get this good girl an exemption for the Paris Games.



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How Olympic gold medalist Gable Steveson became your favorite wrestler’s favorite wrestler

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How many 275-pound men do you know who can do a backflip?

While you’re ruminating on that seemingly trivial question, let’s take this thought exercise a step further: How many 275-pound men do you know who can backflip and capture the attention of Triple H and Ric Flair with their athletic prowess?

I reckon not many come to mind. That’s because Olympic gold medalist Gable Steveson is a rare breed. Scratch that, the tantalizing U.S. wrestler is one-of-a-kind, a bona fide original.

“When and if I can win, put on a good show for America, that flip is coming,” Steveson teased to NBC Chicago of his signature post-victory backflip ahead of his awe-inducing Tokyo run.

On Friday, the ultimate showman made good on his promise.

There’s a fine line between confidence and hubris, and Steveson walks it masterfully. The 21-year-old’s keen sense of self and his belief in his otherworldly abilities is what enabled him to cruise through the first three matches of his Olympic debut without giving up a point.

It’s a feat that’s particularly impressive when you consider one of his opponents was Taha Akgul of Turkey, the defending Olympic champion. Steveson — The University of Minnesota Gophers’ heavyweight, reigning NCAA Division I National Champion and winner of the Dan Hodge Trophy — made light work of Aiaal Lazarev of Kyrgyzstan in his opening match, taking only 2 minutes, 2 seconds to win 10-0. He followed that up with an 8-0 drubbing of Akgul before winning his semifinal match against Lkhagvagerel Munkhtur of Mongolia 5-0 to advance to the men’s freestyle 125kg wrestling final.

“He’s the best heavyweight wrestler to probably ever step foot (on the mat),” Steveson said of Akgul after their quarterfinal showdown. “But his time is up. I came here for business. I came here to win. … Ain’t nothing going to be given to me. I’ve got to go get it.”

And that’s exactly what he did in an incredible comeback win over Geno Petriashvili — the 2016 bronze-medalist and three-time world champion (2017-19) of Georgia — in the final.

Steveson was born in 2000, and America hadn’t won an Olympic gold medal in men’s heavyweight in his lifetime (Bruce Baumgartner, 1992). If you know his story, it’s not surprising that the Apple Valley, Minnesota, native would be the one to get it done.

I’m not saying the Team USA standout’s mom set this all in motion by choosing to name her son after wrestling legend Dan Gable (Steveson’s middle name is Dan), who was a two-time national champion wrestler at Iowa State and an Olympic gold medalist in 1972.

Who am I kidding? That’s exactly what I’m saying. This whole thing feels preordained. Maybe that’s why the charismatic superstar was so fearless and brash about what he intended to do. He was born for this.

“You can see that when the lights get bright, Gable comes to perform,” he told the Associated Press. “And I think that’s number one with me. And I think that’s what people can expect with me wherever I go.”

If the wrestler choosing to address himself in the third person and the above quote gave you strong Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson vibes, you’re on the right track. The pinnacle of athletic achievement, winning an Olympic gold medal, was just the first item on a long list of aspirations for Gable.

The wrestler plans to use the accomplishment to launch his WWE career and eventually hopes to be afforded opportunities like The Rock and his mentor, fellow Minnesota great and WWE champion, Brock Lesnar.

“When you’re a kid, you don’t really know how to make it to the WWE, but when I got to the University of Minnesota, I learned how Brock went about things and how to make connections,” Gable told Gopher Sports.

“My relationship with Brock has been awesome. It’s outstanding that a guy like that has noticed me and has gone out of his way to be there for me and guide me in the right direction.”

It’s not a matter of if he will go down the professional wrestling route, but when.

Steveson has already made a lot of noise in the professional wrestling space without ever stepping in the ring. From appearing in the crowd at NXT TakeOvers and WrestleMania to waving at Vince McMahon on Twitter, Gable has kept his name top of mind among the WWE brass and stars alike.

Then there’s the famed picture of the Team USA standout with Roman Reigns and his manager Paul Heyman.

“The picture of me, Paul (Heyman), and Roman Reigns is gonna go down as maybe one of the best wrestling photos in history,” Steveson said. “Just because the path that I’m taking with it and the path that Roman Reigns has set in stone being a champion, that’ll probably never be defeated again. The path that Paul Heyman has done for wrestling. He’s probably the greatest spokesperson. (He’s going to the) Hall of Fame.”

Steveson’s expectations for his future are larger-than-life, but why shouldn’t they be? He’s a walking, back-flipping testimonial for the benefits of doing it big.



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Olympic gymnastics updates: Simone Biles wins bronze on beam in last day of event finals

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Tuesday morning marked the last time we got to watch our favorite gymnasts compete at the Tokyo Olympic. The final day of gymnastics event finals promised to be special as Simone Biles made her return to the competition floor — and it didn’t disappoint.

The 24-year-old, who withdrew from the women’s team final and other individual events to focus on her mental health upon experiencing the “twisties,” earned a bronze medal on the balance beam with a strong performance and a score of 14.000.

Biles also earned a bronze medal in beam at the 2016 Rio Games. With the newest addition to her hardware collection, she ties Shannon Miller as the most decorated Olympian in American gymnastics history. While each gymnast has seven medals to her name, Biles has more golds (4) than Miller (2).

All-around gold medalist Suni Lee also competed on beam, finishing in fifth place with a score of 13.866.

We have you covered with all the action you might have missed as the curtain closed on the sport in Tokyo:


Biles earns bronze, seventh career Olympic medal

Simone Biles is a bronze medalist again, after matching her result in the balance beam final from Rio. With this, her seventh Olympic medal, Biles becomes the most accomplished American Olympic gymnast in history.

The story of the night was not what color medal Biles earned, but the fact that, after a week no one could have predicted, she returned to competition under the greatest of pressure and scrutiny and showed why she is the sport’s greatest star.

Biles last competed in Tokyo one week ago. She withdrew from last Tuesday’s team final after one rotation and then scratched from the all-around, vault, floor and uneven bar finals to focus on her mental and physical health. She continued to train at a nearby gym and shared her struggles to overcome “the twisties,” a dangerous disconnect between the mind and body that causes gymnasts to become disoriented in the air during twisting skills. Unlike the other three events, beam features minimal twisting and Biles downgraded her dismount from the “Biles” — a double-twisting double tuck — to a double pike.

Biles performed third in the event and took a deep breath before mounting the beam and performed with confidence. When she landed her dismount, she took a big hop backward, a massive smile on her face and then grabbed her heart in relief. She hugged her coach, waved to the photographers and toward the crowd and hugged her teammate. Her 14.00 — just .066 lower than her qualifying score — moved her into second place.

Biles remained in second until the final gymnast of the night, Guan Chenchen of China, mounted the beam. The 16-year-old topped qualifying and performed a routine with the highest difficulty in the meet. Aside from a few small form breaks, she was elegant and masterful and nailed her double pike landing. She earned a 14.633 for gold. China’s Tang Xijing took silver.

New all-around champion Suni Lee had a clean routine going until she lost her footing on the final landing of her difficult acro sequence. She fought to hold on and somehow stayed on the beam. With that mistake, though, she took herself out of medal contention and finished the meet in fifth. — Alyssa Roenigk

Final results:

  1. Guan Chenchen, China – 14.633

  2. Tang Xijing, China – 14.233

  3. Simone Biles, USA – 14.000

  4. Elsabeth Black, Canada – 13.866

  5. Sunisa Lee, USA – 13.866

  6. Urara Ashikawa, Japan – 13.733

  7. Flavia Saraiva, Brazil – 13.133

  8. Vladislava Urazova, ROC – 12.733


Men’s high bar: Hashimoto wins another gold for Japan

Olympic all-around champion Daiki Hashimoto, the first-place qualifier into finals, took the top spot in a high bar final that saw half the field have at least one fall.

Hashimoto threw nearly perfect tucked and laid out full-twisting Kovacs, then stuck his double-twisting double layout dismount for a 15.066, the only score above 15. Croatia’s Tin Srbic nailed four reverse hecht variations in a row and nearly stuck his full-twisting double layout for the silver, while ROC team’s Nikita Nagornyy earned bronze with a lower difficulty score than the top two.

American Brody Malone hit all of his releases and was on his way to a great routine when he had a break at the end and ended up going the wrong way. He scored a 14.200 for fourth, just out of the medals. — Amy Van Deusen

Final results:

  1. Daiki Hashimoto, Japan – 15.066

  2. Tin Srbic, Croatia – 14.900

  3. Nikita Nagornyy, ROC – 14.533

  4. Brody Malone, USA – 14.200

  5. Tyson Bull, Australia – 12.466

  6. Takeru Kitazono, Japan – 12.333

  7. Bart Deurloo, Netherlands – 12.266

  8. Milad Karimi, Kazakhstan – 11.266


Biles is back

Insert GOAT emoji here. Simone Biles made her return to the competition floor with a strong performance on beam. Her score of 14.00 put her in second place behind Tang Xijing (14.233) with five gymnasts still to go.

After her dismount, Biles smiled and put her hand over her heart before running to embrace her coach.


Men’s parallel bars: Zou wins easily, with the top score of the Olympics

Zou Jingyuan of China earned Tuesday’s first gold medal on parallel bars after earning an enormous 16.233 — the highest score so far on any event in gymnastics. The 2017 and 2018 world champion on the event took a tiny step on his double front-half dismount but otherwise was nearly perfect, winning by more than five tenths of a point.

Lukas Dauser of Germany competed last and slipped into the silver-medal spot with a 15.700, and Ferhat ArΔ±can of Turkey took the bronze with a 15.633. It was the first gymnastics medal for Turkey at the Olympic Games, and ArΔ±can was greeted by huge cheers from his country’s contingent in the stands when the final results were posted.

Sam Mikulak, the lone American on the event, finished in sixth with a 15.000. The 28-year-old previously said this would be his final Olympics and he was given a standing ovation from his teammates and members of the women’s team in the stands. He smiled and gave an enthusiastic thumbs-up to the camera after his score was announced. — D’Arcy Maine

Final results:

  1. Zou Jingyuan, China – 16.233

  2. Lukas Dauser, Germany – 15.700

  3. Ferhat Arican, Turkey – 15.633

  4. You Hao, China – 15.466

  5. David Belyavskiy, ROC – 15.200

  6. Sam Mikulak, USA – 15.000

  7. Petro Pakhniuk, Ukraine – 14.533

  8. Joe Fraser, Great Britain – 14.500


Lee’s fam shows support

Meanwhile, back home in St. Paul, Minnesota, Suni Lee’s family stayed up late to watch the American on her final apparatus of the Games.


Biles looks good in warm-ups

All eyes were on Simone Biles during warm-ups ahead of Tuesday’s beam finals. She stretched on the floor before doing several run-throughs of her routine on beam.

Her first turn appeared mainly to get comfortable on the beam, and she spent much of the time visualizing and pantomiming various skills and moves. Her second turn, just moments later, was a full routine and there were no outward signs of struggle. She finished with a nearly stuck double-pike dismount.

Biles looked largely at ease, talking and laughing with Suni Lee while not on the beam. The two even watched highlights of other Olympic events on the video board after they had finished warming up on the apparatus. Biles will be the third competitor on the event, and Lee will be immediately after. — D’Arcy Maine


One more time

And just like that, we’re on to the last day of apparatus finals. All-around champions Hashimoto Daiki (Japan) and Suni Lee (USA) are back in action as titles will be decided on parallel bars, balance beam, and horizontal bar. Not to take away from American men’s gymnasts Sam Mikulak (parallel bars) and Brody Malone (horizontal bar), but all eyes will be on the last event of the women’s individual finals, because Simone Biles is back. The GOAT joins newly minted gold medalist Suni Lee in representing for Team USA on the beam.

Beam is the lone apparatus where past results haunt Biles. Despite being the reigning world champion on beam, it was the only event of Rio 2016 in which the four-time Olympic gold medalist made a real mistake (she still won the bronze).

As for Lee, she was third in qualification behind specialist Guan Chenchen (China) and Tang Xijing (China), who represent a country still searching for its first women’s individual medal of these Games. China’s only gold on balance beam to date was won by Deng Linlin at London 2012. — Tory Barron

The schedule:

4 a.m. ET: Men’s parallel bars
4:50 a.m. ET: Women’s beam
5:39 a.m. ET: Men’s high bar


Men’s vault: Shin ekes out gold

The competition was full of mind-boggling vaults, but in the end, South Korea’s Shin Jeahwan edged ROC team’s Denis Abliazin for the gold medal. Though the two tied in average score, Shin won the tiebreak because he had the highest single score on a vault (a 14.833 for his front handspring 2Β½ twist vs. Abliazin’s 14.800 for his Tsukahara double pike).

Armenia’s Artur Davtyan won the first Olympic medal in gymnastics for his country with a bronze and a 14.733 average. Turkey’s Adem Asil threw a jaw-dropping front handspring double pike half to earn a 15.266, the highest score of any vault in any round of the Olympics. But he put his hands down on his second vault, a Tsukahara double pike, and ended up sixth. — Amy Van Deusen

Final results:

  1. Shin Jeahwan, Korea – 14.783

  2. Denis Abliazin, ROC – 14.783

  3. Artur Davtyan, Armenia – 14.733

  4. Carlos Edriel Yulo, Philippines – 14.716

  5. Nikita Nagornyy, ROC – 14.716

  6. Adem Asil, Turkey – 14.449

  7. Ahmet Onder, Turkey – 14.066

  8. Caio Souza, Brazil – 13.683


Women’s floor: Carey gets her redemption

American Jade Carey entered the floor final as a gold-medal favorite and she delivered, competing a beautiful laid out double-double first pass, then rocking her tucked double-double and full-twisting double layout as well. With the highest difficulty of the day (four-tenths of a point higher than any other competitor) she competed second and her score held for the rest of the meet.

Thirty-year-old Italian Vanessa Ferrari stuck her first two passes — a tucked double-double and a whip to immediate full-in — absolutely cold, and drew everyone in with her expressive dance. The 2006 world all-around champion earned a 14.200 for the silver.

Japan’s Mai Murakami and the ROC team’s Angelina Melnikova tied for bronze, both with powerful double layouts as their second pass. Melnikova mounted with a gorgeous full-twisting double layout, while Murakami threw a nice tucked double-double. Their matching difficulty and execution scores earned them both the bronze with no tiebreak. — Amy Van Deusen

1. Jade Carey, USA – 14.366
2. Vanessa Ferrari, Italy – 14.200
3. Mai Murakami, Japan – 14.166 | Angelina Melnikova, ROC – 14.166
5. Rebeca Andrade, Brazil – 14.033
6. Jessica Gadirova, Great Britain – 14.000
7. Jennifer Gadirova, Great Britain – 13.233
8. Viktoriia Listunova, ROC – 12.400


Breaking news: Biles on beam!


Men’s rings: Chinese men dominate

It was a 1-2 finish for China in the first gymnastics final of the day Monday. Liu Yang took home the gold in rings and You Hao finished with the silver. The duo, who competed back to back, held up a Chinese flag and posed together for photos once the final scores were revealed.

It was the first gold medal for China in artistic gymnastics during the 2020 Games.

Yang, who was the 2014 world champion in the event, took a small hop on the landing of his double-twisting double-tuck dismount landing, but otherwise was nearly flawless and earned a 15.500. Hao finished 0.2 behind with a 15.300.

Greece’s Eleftherios Petrounias earned the bronze. — D’Arcy Maine

Final results:

  1. Liu Yang, China – 15.500

  2. You Hao, China – 15.300

  3. Eleftherios Petrounias, Greece – 15.200

  4. Samir Ait Said, France – 14.900

  5. Ibrahim Colak, Turkey – 14.866

  6. Denis Abliazin, ROC – 14.833

  7. Adem Asil, Turkey – 14.600

  8. Arthur Zanetti, Brazil – 14.133



Next up: Vault, floor and rings

Monday was the second day of individual event finals, and it was a combination of men’s and women’s events again: men’s rings, women’s floor and men’s vault. The top eight highest-scoring gymnasts from qualifying advanced on each event, with a maximum of two from any one country. The scores didn’t carry over, however — the highest score Monday was crowned Olympic champ.

The schedule:

4 a.m. ET: Men’s rings
4:45 a.m. ET: Women’s floor
5:54 a.m. ET: Men’s vault


Women’s uneven bars: Derwael wins gold; Lee hangs on for bronze

Two-time world champion Nina Derwael, the top qualifier entering the finals, performed her highly difficult, jam-packed routine well to win the event easily for Belgium. She earned a 15.200 score — and her country’s first Olympic gymnastics gold medal in history. The ROC team’s Anastasiia Iliankova hit her routine cleanly for the silver medal — and American Suni Lee held on for bronze.

Olympic all-around gold medalist Lee was first in the lineup and was a little off from the start, missing the connections on her release moves in more than one section of her routine. Though her quick thinking throughout helped her avoid disaster, it affected her difficulty score. Lee earned a 14.500, seven-tenths of a point lower than her qualifying score.

It appeared several of the gymnasts, Lee included, might have been affected by the reportedly cold arena and lack of a one-touch warm-up. All-around bronze medalist Angelina Melnikova (ROC) couldn’t get over on a pirouette and had to hop off, while China’s Fan Yilin — the 2015 and 2017 world champion on bars — fell on her dismount. — Amy Van Deusen

Former Olympians took to Twitter to express their concern over the temperature and lack of one-touch warm-up ahead of events:

Final results:

  1. Nina Derwael, Belgium – 15.200

  2. Anastasiia Iliankova, ROC – 14.833

  3. Suni Lee, USA – 14.500

  4. Lu Yufei, China – 14.400

  5. Elisabeth Seitz, Germany – 14.400

  6. Melanie de Jesus dos Santos, France – 14.033

  7. Fan Yilin, China – 13.900

  8. Angelina Melnikova, ROC – 13.066


Men’s pommel horse: Whitlock retains title

In the final men’s event of the day, Max Whitlock of Great Britain, a three-time Olympian, repeated as pommel horse champion.

Competing in the tough opening spot, Whitlock’s routine featured the highest start value in the meet, a 7.0, which was two-tenths higher than any of his competitors. And it was clean. He also earned the second-highest execution score of the night. His 15.583 set a tough bar for the next seven men to clear.

Lee Chih Kai of Chinese Taipei finished in the silver-medal spot and Japan’s Kazuma Kaya earned bronze.

American Alec Yoder, who competed second, was off from the start of his routine. He had a major form break immediately in his routine and seemed to lose focus afterward. His 14.666 was enough to hold him in medal contention until Lee competed. He finished sixth.

Rhys McClenaghan, who earned attention as the funniest gymnast in Tokyo after posting about the “anti-sex beds” in the athletes village, was the first Irish gymnast to make an Olympic final. Unfortunately, he had difficulty throughout his routine and fell from the apparatus. He finished seventh. — Alyssa Roenigk

Final results:

  1. Max Whitlock, Great Britain – 15.583

  2. Lee Chih-kai, Chinese Taipei – 15.400

  3. Kazuma Kaya, Japan – 14.900

  4. David Belyavskiy, ROC – 14.833

  5. Kohei Kameyama, Japan – 14.600

  6. Alec Yoder, USA – 14.566

  7. Rhys McClenaghan, Ireland -13.100

  8. Sun Wei, China – 13.066


Women’s vault: Andrade continues to wow, and Skinner’s unlikely Olympic medal

One week ago, MyKayla Skinner thought that her Olympic competition had ended in the qualification round. Sunday, she stood on an Olympic podium, a silver medalist on vault.

With defending Olympic vault champion Simone Biles — whose withdrawal placed Skinner into the event — loudly cheering her on from the stands, Skinner opened the meet with a clean Cheng. It was her best vault of the Games and earned a 15.033, a higher score than either of her vaults during qualifying. On her second vault, an Amanar, Skinner took a slight hop to the left on her landing but kept her feet in bounds, good enough for a 14.8 and an overall score of 14.916.

Brazilian Rebeca Andrade, coming off her silver-medal performance in the all-around, competed two gymnasts later with the same vaults and more amplitude, besting Skinner by a little over a 10th of a point and ultimately edging her for gold. Brazil had never won an Olympic medal in women’s gymnastics until earlier this week, and now Andrade has won two.

Unlike in qualifying and team competition, gymnasts are not provided with what is known as a “one-touch warm-up” or a last-minute opportunity to warm up on the competition apparatus immediately before they compete. That rule has been highly debated, as the conversation at these Games has centered around athlete health and safety, especially in gymnastics.

On American Jade Carey’s first vault, she misstepped on the runway as she approached the springboard and somehow had the wherewithal to throw just a tuck off the table. She saved her body from injury, but the mistake ended her night. Immediately, gymnastics fans took to Twitter to call for #onetouchfinals. Impressively, though, Carey regrouped, went back to the start of the runway and performed a beautiful Amanar. Her dad, Brian, who is also her coach, hugged her tightly and consoled her after her turn.

Korean gymnast Yeo Seo-jeong performed a vault named for her and — 25 years after her father took silver in the event at the 1996 Games — earned the bronze. — Alyssa Roenigk

Final results:

  1. Rebeca Andrade, Brazil – 15.083

  2. MyKayla Skinner, USA – 14.916

  3. Yeo Seo-jeong, Korea – 14.733

  4. Alexa Moreno, Mexico – 14.716

  5. Angelina Melnikova, ROC – 14.683

  6. Liliia Akhaimova, ROC – 14.666

  7. Shallon Olsen, Canada – 13.066

  8. Jade Carey, USA – 12.416


Men’s floor exercise: History for Israel

In the first of four gymnastics event finals on Sunday at the Ariake Gymnastics Centre, Artem Dolgopyat of Israel won the gold medal on floor.

It was the first medal ever for Israel in gymnastics and is the country’s lone gold medal of the 2020 Olympics thus far, and third medal overall.

Dolgopyat, the 2020 European Champion on the event, had the highest score in qualifying and continued his dominance on Sunday. His mark was tied with Spain’s Rayderley Zapata, but Dolgopyat won the second tiebreak because of a higher difficulty score.

Zapata earned the silver medal, and Ruoteng Xiao of China won the bronze.

Yul Moldauer, the only American in the competition, finished in sixth place out of eight. He stuck all but one of his tumbling passes, but he caught his foot during a flair sequence. — D’Arcy Maine

Final results:

  1. Artem Dolgopyat, Israel – 14.933

  2. Rayderley Zapata, Spain – 14.933

  3. Ruoteng Xiao, China – 14.766

  4. Sunghyun Ryu, South Korea – 14.233

  5. Milad Karimi, Kazakhstan – 14.133

  6. Yul Moldauer, USA – 13.533

  7. Nikita Nagornyy, ROC – 13.066

  8. Hansol Kim, South Korea – 13.066


Let the individual event finals begin

Sunday was the first day of individual event finals, and it was a combination of men’s and women’s events. The top eight highest-scoring gymnasts from qualifying advanced on each event, with a maximum of two per country. The preliminary scores were erased, however. The highest score on Sunday won.

The schedule — hope you had your coffee on hand for this one:

4 a.m. ET: men’s floor
4:45 a.m. ET: women’s vault
5:45 a.m. ET: men’s pommel horse
6:27 a.m. ET: women’s uneven bars


Could you tell us more about the Americans?

Funny you should ask. By this point, you’ve probably heard of Suni Lee. But if you haven’t, you should definitely check out this story on her impressive all-around win. There is also a video of her and her dad doing backflips that we can’t recommend strongly enough.

Jade Carey and MyKayla Skinner both qualified to Tokyo as individual competitors, and both have had wild rides during this Olympics. Skinner thought her Olympic experience was over after the qualifying rounds, while Carey took Biles’ spot in the all-around when Biles withdrew.



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Olympic gymnastics live updates: Simone Biles and Suni Lee compete on beam in last day of event finals

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Tuesday morning will mark the last time we get to watch our favorite gymnasts compete at the Tokyo Olympics. The final day of gymnastics event finals promises to be special as Simone Biles makes her return to the competition floor. The 24-year-old withdrew from the women’s team final and other individual events to focus on her mental health upon experiencing the “twisties”.

Biles, who earned a bronze medal in beam at the 2016 Rio Games, joins all-around gold medalist Suni Lee in her quest for one more piece of hardware. Biles was all smiles during the warm-up prior to the balance beam final.

If you’ve been following gymnastics at the Games thus far, you already know the action gets underway incredibly early. You also know we’ll have you covered with live updates throughout:


Biles earns bronze, ties Shannon Miller for most decorated U.S. gymnast

Final results:

  1. Guan Chenchen, China – 14.633

  2. Tang Xijing, China – 14.233

  3. Simone Biles, USA – 14.000

  4. Sunisa Lee, USA – 13.866

  5. Elsabeth Black, Canada – 13.866

  6. Urara Ashikawa, Japan – 13.733

  7. Flavia Saraiva, Brazil – 13.133

  8. Vladislava Urazova, ROC – 12.733


Biles is back

Insert GOAT emoji here. Simone Biles made her return to the competition floor with a strong performance on beam. Her score of 14.00 put her in second place behind Tang Xijing (14.233) with five gymnasts still to go.

After her dismount, Biles smiled and put her hand over her heart before running to embrace her coach.


Men’s parallel bars: Zou wins easily, with the top score of the Olympics

Zou Jingyuan of China earned Tuesday’s first gold medal on parallel bars after earning an enormous 16.233 — the highest score so far on any event in gymnastics. The 2017 and 2018 world champion on the event took a tiny step on his double front-half dismount but otherwise was nearly perfect, winning by more than five tenths of a point.

Lukas Dauser of Germany competed last and slipped into the silver-medal spot with a 15.700, and Ferhat ArΔ±can of Turkey took the bronze with a 15.633. It was the first gymnastics medal for Turkey at the Olympic Games, and ArΔ±can was greeted by huge cheers from his country’s contingent in the stands when the final results were posted.

Sam Mikulak, the lone American on the event, finished in sixth with a 15.000. The 28-year-old previously said this would be his final Olympics and he was given a standing ovation from his teammates and members of the women’s team in the stands. He smiled and gave an enthusiastic thumbs up to the camera after his score was announced. — D’Arcy Maine

Final results:

  1. Zou Jingyuan, China – 16.233

  2. Lukas Dauser, Germany – 15.700

  3. Ferhat Arican, Turkey – 15.633

  4. You Hao, China – 15.466

  5. David Belyavskiy, ROC – 15.200

  6. Sam Mikulak, USA – 15.000

  7. Petro Pakhniuk, Ukraine – 14.533

  8. Joe Fraser, Great Britain – 14.500


Lee’s fam shows support

Meanwhile, back home in St. Paul, Minnesota, Suni Lee’s family is staying up late to watch the American on her final apparatus of the Games.


Biles looks good in warm-ups

All eyes were on Simone Biles during warm-ups ahead of Tuesday’s beam finals. She stretched on the floor before doing several run-throughs of her routine on beam.

Her first turn appeared mainly to get comfortable on the beam, and she spent much of the time visualizing and pantomiming various skills and moves. Her second turn, just moments later, was a full routine and there were no outward signs of struggle. She finished with a nearly stuck double-pike dismount.

Biles looked largely at ease, talking and laughing with Suni Lee while not on the beam. The two even watched highlights of other Olympic events on the video board after they had finished warming up on the apparatus. Biles will be the third competitor on the event tonight, and Lee will be immediately after. — D’Arcy Maine


One more time

And just like that, we’re on to the last day of apparatus finals. All-around champions Hashimoto Daiki (Japan) and Suni Lee (USA) are back in action as titles will be decided on parallel bars, balance beam, and horizontal bar. Not to take away from American men’s gymnasts Sam Mikulak (parallel bars) and Brody Malone (horizontal bar), but all eyes will be on the last event of the women’s individual finals, because Simone Biles is back. The GOAT joins newly minted gold medalist Suni Lee in representing for Team USA on the beam.

Beam is the lone apparatus where past results haunt Biles. Despite being the reigning world champion on beam, it was the only event of Rio 2016 in which the four-time Olympic gold medalist made a real mistake (she still won the bronze).

As for Lee, she was third in qualification behind specialist Guan Chenchen (China) and Tang Xijing (China), who represent a country still searching for its first women’s individual medal of these Games. China’s only gold on balance beam to date was won by Deng Linlin at London 2012.

The schedule:

4 a.m. ET: Men’s parallel bars
4:50 a.m. ET: Women’s beam
5:39 a.m. ET: Men’s high bar


Men’s vault: Shin ekes out gold

The competition was full of mind-boggling vaults, but in the end, South Korea’s Shin Jeahwan edged ROC team’s Denis Abliazin for the gold medal. Though the two tied in average score, Shin won the tiebreak because he had the highest single score on a vault (a 14.833 for his front handspring 2Β½ twist vs. Abliazin’s 14.800 for his Tsukahara double pike).

Armenia’s Artur Davtyan won the first Olympic medal in gymnastics for his country with a bronze and a 14.733 average. Turkey’s Adem Asil threw a jaw-dropping front handspring double pike half to earn a 15.266, the highest score of any vault in any round of the Olympics. But he put his hands down on his second vault, a Tsukahara double pike, and ended up sixth. — Amy Van Deusen

Final results:

  1. Shin Jeahwan, Korea – 14.783

  2. Denis Abliazin, ROC – 14.783

  3. Artur Davtyan, Armenia – 14.733

  4. Carlos Edriel Yulo, Philippines – 14.716

  5. Nikita Nagornyy, ROC – 14.716

  6. Adem Asil, Turkey – 14.449

  7. Ahmet Onder, Turkey – 14.066

  8. Caio Souza, Brazil – 13.683


Women’s floor: Carey gets her redemption

American Jade Carey entered the floor final as a gold-medal favorite and she delivered, competing a beautiful laid out double-double first pass, then rocking her tucked double-double and full-twisting double layout as well. With the highest difficulty of the day (four-tenths of a point higher than any other competitor) she competed second and her score held for the rest of the meet.

Thirty-year-old Italian Vanessa Ferrari stuck her first two passes — a tucked double-double and a whip to immediate full-in — absolutely cold, and drew everyone in with her expressive dance. The 2006 world all-around champion earned a 14.200 for the silver.

Japan’s Mai Murakami and the ROC team’s Angelina Melnikova tied for bronze, both with powerful double layouts as their second pass. Melnikova mounted with a gorgeous full-twisting double layout, while Murakami threw a nice tucked double-double. Their matching difficulty and execution scores earned them both the bronze with no tiebreak. — Amy Van Deusen

1. Jade Carey, USA – 14.366
2. Vanessa Ferrari, Italy – 14.200
3. Mai Murakami, Japan – 14.166 | Angelina Melnikova, ROC – 14.166
5. Rebeca Andrade, Brazil – 14.033
6. Jessica Gadirova, Great Britain – 14.000
7. Jennifer Gadirova, Great Britain – 13.233
8. Viktoriia Listunova, ROC – 12.400


Breaking news: Biles on beam!


Men’s rings: Chinese men dominate

It was a 1-2 finish for China in the first gymnastics final of the day Monday. Liu Yang took home the gold in rings and You Hao finished with the silver. The duo, who competed back to back, held up a Chinese flag and posed together for photos once the final scores were revealed.

It was the first gold medal for China in artistic gymnastics during the 2020 Games.

Yang, who was the 2014 world champion in the event, took a small hop on the landing of his double-twisting double-tuck dismount landing, but otherwise was nearly flawless and earned a 15.500. Hao finished 0.2 behind with a 15.300.

Greece’s Eleftherios Petrounias earned the bronze. — D’Arcy Maine

Final results:

  1. Liu Yang, China – 15.500

  2. You Hao, China – 15.300

  3. Eleftherios Petrounias, Greece – 15.200

  4. Samir Ait Said, France – 14.900

  5. Ibrahim Colak, Turkey – 14.866

  6. Denis Abliazin, ROC – 14.833

  7. Adem Asil, Turkey – 14.600

  8. Arthur Zanetti, Brazil – 14.133



Next up: Vault, floor and rings

Monday was the second day of individual event finals, and it was a combination of men’s and women’s events again: men’s rings, women’s floor and men’s vault. The top eight highest-scoring gymnasts from qualifying advanced on each event, with a maximum of two from any one country. The scores didn’t carry over, however — the highest score Monday was crowned Olympic champ.

The schedule:

4 a.m. ET: Men’s rings
4:45 a.m. ET: Women’s floor
5:54 a.m. ET: Men’s vault


Women’s uneven bars: Derwael wins gold; Lee hangs on for bronze

Two-time world champion Nina Derwael, the top qualifier entering the finals, performed her highly difficult, jam-packed routine well to win the event easily for Belgium. She earned a 15.200 score — and her country’s first Olympic gymnastics gold medal in history. The ROC team’s Anastasiia Iliankova hit her routine cleanly for the silver medal — and American Suni Lee held on for bronze.

Olympic all-around gold medalist Lee was first in the lineup and was a little off from the start, missing the connections on her release moves in more than one section of her routine. Though her quick thinking throughout helped her avoid disaster, it affected her difficulty score. Lee earned a 14.500, seven-tenths of a point lower than her qualifying score.

It appeared several of the gymnasts, Lee included, might have been affected by the reportedly cold arena and lack of a one-touch warm-up. All-around bronze medalist Angelina Melnikova (ROC) couldn’t get over on a pirouette and had to hop off, while China’s Fan Yilin — the 2015 and 2017 world champion on bars — fell on her dismount. — Amy Van Deusen

Former Olympians took to Twitter to express their concern over the temperature and lack of one-touch warm-up ahead of events:

Final results:

  1. Nina Derwael, Belgium – 15.200

  2. Anastasiia Iliankova, ROC – 14.833

  3. Suni Lee, USA – 14.500

  4. Lu Yufei, China – 14.400

  5. Elisabeth Seitz, Germany – 14.400

  6. Melanie de Jesus dos Santos, France – 14.033

  7. Fan Yilin, China – 13.900

  8. Angelina Melnikova, ROC – 13.066


Men’s pommel horse: Whitlock retains title

In the final men’s event of the day, Max Whitlock of Great Britain, a three-time Olympian, repeated as pommel horse champion.

Competing in the tough opening spot, Whitlock’s routine featured the highest start value in the meet, a 7.0, which was two-tenths higher than any of his competitors. And it was clean. He also earned the second-highest execution score of the night. His 15.583 set a tough bar for the next seven men to clear.

Lee Chih Kai of Chinese Taipei finished in the silver-medal spot and Japan’s Kazuma Kaya earned bronze.

American Alec Yoder, who competed second, was off from the start of his routine. He had a major form break immediately in his routine and seemed to lose focus afterward. His 14.666 was enough to hold him in medal contention until Lee competed. He finished sixth.

Rhys McClenaghan, who earned attention as the funniest gymnast in Tokyo after posting about the “anti-sex beds” in the athletes village, was the first Irish gymnast to make an Olympic final. Unfortunately, he had difficulty throughout his routine and fell from the apparatus. He finished seventh. — Alyssa Roenigk

Final results:

  1. Max Whitlock, Great Britain – 15.583

  2. Lee Chih-kai, Chinese Taipei – 15.400

  3. Kazuma Kaya, Japan – 14.900

  4. David Belyavskiy, ROC – 14.833

  5. Kohei Kameyama, Japan – 14.600

  6. Alec Yoder, USA – 14.566

  7. Rhys McClenaghan, Ireland -13.100

  8. Sun Wei, China – 13.066


Women’s vault: Andrade continues to wow, and Skinner’s unlikely Olympic medal

One week ago, MyKayla Skinner thought that her Olympic competition had ended in the qualification round. Sunday, she stood on an Olympic podium, a silver medalist on vault.

With defending Olympic vault champion Simone Biles — whose withdrawal placed Skinner into the event — loudly cheering her on from the stands, Skinner opened the meet with a clean Cheng. It was her best vault of the Games and earned a 15.033, a higher score than either of her vaults during qualifying. On her second vault, an Amanar, Skinner took a slight hop to the left on her landing but kept her feet in bounds, good enough for a 14.8 and an overall score of 14.916.

Brazilian Rebeca Andrade, coming off her silver-medal performance in the all-around, competed two gymnasts later with the same vaults and more amplitude, besting Skinner by a little over a 10th of a point and ultimately edging her for gold. Brazil had never won an Olympic medal in women’s gymnastics until earlier this week, and now Andrade has won two.

Unlike in qualifying and team competition, gymnasts are not provided with what is known as a “one-touch warm-up” or a last-minute opportunity to warm up on the competition apparatus immediately before they compete. That rule has been highly debated, as the conversation at these Games has centered around athlete health and safety, especially in gymnastics.

On American Jade Carey’s first vault, she misstepped on the runway as she approached the springboard and somehow had the wherewithal to throw just a tuck off the table. She saved her body from injury, but the mistake ended her night. Immediately, gymnastics fans took to Twitter to call for #onetouchfinals. Impressively, though, Carey regrouped, went back to the start of the runway and performed a beautiful Amanar. Her dad, Brian, who is also her coach, hugged her tightly and consoled her after her turn.

Korean gymnast Yeo Seo-jeong performed a vault named for her and — 25 years after her father took silver in the event at the 1996 Games — earned the bronze. — Alyssa Roenigk

Final results:

  1. Rebeca Andrade, Brazil – 15.083

  2. MyKayla Skinner, USA – 14.916

  3. Yeo Seo-jeong, Korea – 14.733

  4. Alexa Moreno, Mexico – 14.716

  5. Angelina Melnikova, ROC – 14.683

  6. Liliia Akhaimova, ROC – 14.666

  7. Shallon Olsen, Canada – 13.066

  8. Jade Carey, USA – 12.416


Men’s floor exercise: History for Israel

In the first of four gymnastics event finals on Sunday at the Ariake Gymnastics Centre, Artem Dolgopyat of Israel won the gold medal on floor.

It was the first medal ever for Israel in gymnastics and is the country’s lone gold medal of the 2020 Olympics thus far, and third medal overall.

Dolgopyat, the 2020 European Champion on the event, had the highest score in qualifying and continued his dominance on Sunday. His mark was tied with Spain’s Rayderley Zapata, but Dolgopyat won the second tiebreak because of a higher difficulty score.

Zapata earned the silver medal, and Ruoteng Xiao of China won the bronze.

Yul Moldauer, the only American in the competition, finished in sixth place out of eight. He stuck all but one of his tumbling passes, but he caught his foot during a flair sequence. — D’Arcy Maine

Final results:

  1. Artem Dolgopyat, Israel – 14.933

  2. Rayderley Zapata, Spain – 14.933

  3. Ruoteng Xiao, China – 14.766

  4. Sunghyun Ryu, South Korea – 14.233

  5. Milad Karimi, Kazakhstan – 14.133

  6. Yul Moldauer, USA – 13.533

  7. Nikita Nagornyy, ROC – 13.066

  8. Hansol Kim, South Korea – 13.066


Let the individual event finals begin

Sunday was the first day of individual event finals, and it was a combination of men’s and women’s events. The top eight highest-scoring gymnasts from qualifying advanced on each event, with a maximum of two per country. The preliminary scores were erased, however. The highest score on Sunday won.

The schedule — hope you had your coffee on hand for this one:

4 a.m. ET: men’s floor
4:45 a.m. ET: women’s vault
5:45 a.m. ET: men’s pommel horse
6:27 a.m. ET: women’s uneven bars


Could you tell us more about the Americans?

Funny you should ask. By this point, you’ve probably heard of Suni Lee. But if you haven’t, you should definitely check out this story on her impressive all-around win. There is also a video of her and her dad doing backflips that we can’t recommend strongly enough.

Jade Carey and MyKayla Skinner both qualified to Tokyo as individual competitors, and both have had wild rides during this Olympics. Skinner thought her Olympic experience was over after the qualifying rounds, while Carey took Biles’ spot in the all-around when Biles withdrew.



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Olympic gymnastics live updates: Simone Biles and Suni Lee compete on beam in last day of event finals

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Tuesday morning will mark the last time we get to watch our favorite gymnasts compete at the Tokyo Olympics. The final day of gymnastics event finals promises to be special as Simone Biles makes her return to the competition floor. The 24-year-old withdrew from the women’s team final and other individual events to focus on her mental health upon experiencing the “twisties”.

Biles, who earned a bronze medal in beam at the 2016 Rio Games, joins all-around gold medalist Suni Lee in her quest for one more piece of hardware. Biles was all smiles during the warm-up prior to the balance beam final.

If you’ve been following gymnastics at the Games thus far, you already know the action gets underway incredibly early. You also know we’ll have you covered with live updates throughout:


Biles is back

Insert GOAT emoji here. Simone Biles made her return to the competition floor with a strong performance on beam. Her score of 14.00 put her in second place behind Tang Xijing (14.233) with gymnasts still to go.

After her dismount, Biles smiled and put her hand over her heart before running to embrace her coach.


Men’s parallel bars: Zou wins easily, with the top score of the Olympics

Zou Jingyuan of China earned Tuesday’s first gold medal on parallel bars after earning an enormous 16.233 — the highest score so far on any event in gymnastics. The 2017 and 2018 world champion on the event took a tiny step on his double front-half dismount but otherwise was nearly perfect, winning by more than five tenths of a point.

Lukas Dauser of Germany competed last and slipped into the silver-medal spot with a 15.700, and Ferhat ArΔ±can of Turkey took the bronze with a 15.633. It was the first gymnastics medal for Turkey at the Olympic Games, and ArΔ±can was greeted by huge cheers from his country’s contingent in the stands when the final results were posted.

Sam Mikulak, the lone American on the event, finished in sixth with a 15.000. The 28-year-old previously said this would be his final Olympics and he was given a standing ovation from his teammates and members of the women’s team in the stands. He smiled and gave an enthusiastic thumbs up to the camera after his score was announced. — D’Arcy Maine

Final results:

  1. Zou Jingyuan, China – 16.233

  2. Lukas Dauser, Germany – 15.700

  3. Ferhat Arican, Turkey – 15.633

  4. You Hao, China – 15.466

  5. David Belyavskiy, ROC – 15.200

  6. Sam Mikulak, USA – 15.000

  7. Petro Pakhniuk, Ukraine – 14.533

  8. Joe Fraser, Great Britain – 14.500


Lee’s fam shows support

Meanwhile, back home in St. Paul, Minnesota, Suni Lee’s family is staying up late to watch the American on her final apparatus of the Games.


Biles looks good in warm-ups

All eyes were on Simone Biles during warm-ups ahead of Tuesday’s beam finals. She stretched on the floor before doing several run-throughs of her routine on beam.

Her first turn appeared mainly to get comfortable on the beam, and she spent much of the time visualizing and pantomiming various skills and moves. Her second turn, just moments later, was a full routine and there were no outward signs of struggle. She finished with a nearly stuck double-pike dismount.

Biles looked largely at ease, talking and laughing with Suni Lee while not on the beam. The two even watched highlights of other Olympic events on the video board after they had finished warming up on the apparatus. Biles will be the third competitor on the event tonight, and Lee will be immediately after. — D’Arcy Maine


One more time

And just like that, we’re on to the last day of apparatus finals. All-around champions Hashimoto Daiki (Japan) and Suni Lee (USA) are back in action as titles will be decided on parallel bars, balance beam, and horizontal bar. Not to take away from American men’s gymnasts Sam Mikulak (parallel bars) and Brody Malone (horizontal bar), but all eyes will be on the last event of the women’s individual finals, because Simone Biles is back. The GOAT joins newly minted gold medalist Suni Lee in representing for Team USA on the beam.

Beam is the lone apparatus where past results haunt Biles. Despite being the reigning world champion on beam, it was the only event of Rio 2016 in which the four-time Olympic gold medalist made a real mistake (she still won the bronze).

As for Lee, she was third in qualification behind specialist Guan Chenchen (China) and Tang Xijing (China), who represent a country still searching for its first women’s individual medal of these Games. China’s only gold on balance beam to date was won by Deng Linlin at London 2012.

The schedule:

4 a.m. ET: Men’s parallel bars
4:50 a.m. ET: Women’s beam
5:39 a.m. ET: Men’s high bar


Men’s vault: Shin ekes out gold

The competition was full of mind-boggling vaults, but in the end, South Korea’s Shin Jeahwan edged ROC team’s Denis Abliazin for the gold medal. Though the two tied in average score, Shin won the tiebreak because he had the highest single score on a vault (a 14.833 for his front handspring 2Β½ twist vs. Abliazin’s 14.800 for his Tsukahara double pike).

Armenia’s Artur Davtyan won the first Olympic medal in gymnastics for his country with a bronze and a 14.733 average. Turkey’s Adem Asil threw a jaw-dropping front handspring double pike half to earn a 15.266, the highest score of any vault in any round of the Olympics. But he put his hands down on his second vault, a Tsukahara double pike, and ended up sixth. — Amy Van Deusen

Final results:

  1. Shin Jeahwan, Korea – 14.783

  2. Denis Abliazin, ROC – 14.783

  3. Artur Davtyan, Armenia – 14.733

  4. Carlos Edriel Yulo, Philippines – 14.716

  5. Nikita Nagornyy, ROC – 14.716

  6. Adem Asil, Turkey – 14.449

  7. Ahmet Onder, Turkey – 14.066

  8. Caio Souza, Brazil – 13.683


Women’s floor: Carey gets her redemption

American Jade Carey entered the floor final as a gold-medal favorite and she delivered, competing a beautiful laid out double-double first pass, then rocking her tucked double-double and full-twisting double layout as well. With the highest difficulty of the day (four-tenths of a point higher than any other competitor) she competed second and her score held for the rest of the meet.

Thirty-year-old Italian Vanessa Ferrari stuck her first two passes — a tucked double-double and a whip to immediate full-in — absolutely cold, and drew everyone in with her expressive dance. The 2006 world all-around champion earned a 14.200 for the silver.

Japan’s Mai Murakami and the ROC team’s Angelina Melnikova tied for bronze, both with powerful double layouts as their second pass. Melnikova mounted with a gorgeous full-twisting double layout, while Murakami threw a nice tucked double-double. Their matching difficulty and execution scores earned them both the bronze with no tiebreak. — Amy Van Deusen

1. Jade Carey, USA – 14.366
2. Vanessa Ferrari, Italy – 14.200
3. Mai Murakami, Japan – 14.166 | Angelina Melnikova, ROC – 14.166
5. Rebeca Andrade, Brazil – 14.033
6. Jessica Gadirova, Great Britain – 14.000
7. Jennifer Gadirova, Great Britain – 13.233
8. Viktoriia Listunova, ROC – 12.400


Breaking news: Biles on beam!


Men’s rings: Chinese men dominate

It was a 1-2 finish for China in the first gymnastics final of the day Monday. Liu Yang took home the gold in rings and You Hao finished with the silver. The duo, who competed back to back, held up a Chinese flag and posed together for photos once the final scores were revealed.

It was the first gold medal for China in artistic gymnastics during the 2020 Games.

Yang, who was the 2014 world champion in the event, took a small hop on the landing of his double-twisting double-tuck dismount landing, but otherwise was nearly flawless and earned a 15.500. Hao finished 0.2 behind with a 15.300.

Greece’s Eleftherios Petrounias earned the bronze. — D’Arcy Maine

Final results:

  1. Liu Yang, China – 15.500

  2. You Hao, China – 15.300

  3. Eleftherios Petrounias, Greece – 15.200

  4. Samir Ait Said, France – 14.900

  5. Ibrahim Colak, Turkey – 14.866

  6. Denis Abliazin, ROC – 14.833

  7. Adem Asil, Turkey – 14.600

  8. Arthur Zanetti, Brazil – 14.133



Next up: Vault, floor and rings

Monday was the second day of individual event finals, and it was a combination of men’s and women’s events again: men’s rings, women’s floor and men’s vault. The top eight highest-scoring gymnasts from qualifying advanced on each event, with a maximum of two from any one country. The scores didn’t carry over, however — the highest score Monday was crowned Olympic champ.

The schedule:

4 a.m. ET: Men’s rings
4:45 a.m. ET: Women’s floor
5:54 a.m. ET: Men’s vault


Women’s uneven bars: Derwael wins gold; Lee hangs on for bronze

Two-time world champion Nina Derwael, the top qualifier entering the finals, performed her highly difficult, jam-packed routine well to win the event easily for Belgium. She earned a 15.200 score — and her country’s first Olympic gymnastics gold medal in history. The ROC team’s Anastasiia Iliankova hit her routine cleanly for the silver medal — and American Suni Lee held on for bronze.

Olympic all-around gold medalist Lee was first in the lineup and was a little off from the start, missing the connections on her release moves in more than one section of her routine. Though her quick thinking throughout helped her avoid disaster, it affected her difficulty score. Lee earned a 14.500, seven-tenths of a point lower than her qualifying score.

It appeared several of the gymnasts, Lee included, might have been affected by the reportedly cold arena and lack of a one-touch warm-up. All-around bronze medalist Angelina Melnikova (ROC) couldn’t get over on a pirouette and had to hop off, while China’s Fan Yilin — the 2015 and 2017 world champion on bars — fell on her dismount. — Amy Van Deusen

Former Olympians took to Twitter to express their concern over the temperature and lack of one-touch warm-up ahead of events:

Final results:

  1. Nina Derwael, Belgium – 15.200

  2. Anastasiia Iliankova, ROC – 14.833

  3. Suni Lee, USA – 14.500

  4. Lu Yufei, China – 14.400

  5. Elisabeth Seitz, Germany – 14.400

  6. Melanie de Jesus dos Santos, France – 14.033

  7. Fan Yilin, China – 13.900

  8. Angelina Melnikova, ROC – 13.066


Men’s pommel horse: Whitlock retains title

In the final men’s event of the day, Max Whitlock of Great Britain, a three-time Olympian, repeated as pommel horse champion.

Competing in the tough opening spot, Whitlock’s routine featured the highest start value in the meet, a 7.0, which was two-tenths higher than any of his competitors. And it was clean. He also earned the second-highest execution score of the night. His 15.583 set a tough bar for the next seven men to clear.

Lee Chih Kai of Chinese Taipei finished in the silver-medal spot and Japan’s Kazuma Kaya earned bronze.

American Alec Yoder, who competed second, was off from the start of his routine. He had a major form break immediately in his routine and seemed to lose focus afterward. His 14.666 was enough to hold him in medal contention until Lee competed. He finished sixth.

Rhys McClenaghan, who earned attention as the funniest gymnast in Tokyo after posting about the “anti-sex beds” in the athletes village, was the first Irish gymnast to make an Olympic final. Unfortunately, he had difficulty throughout his routine and fell from the apparatus. He finished seventh. — Alyssa Roenigk

Final results:

  1. Max Whitlock, Great Britain – 15.583

  2. Lee Chih-kai, Chinese Taipei – 15.400

  3. Kazuma Kaya, Japan – 14.900

  4. David Belyavskiy, ROC – 14.833

  5. Kohei Kameyama, Japan – 14.600

  6. Alec Yoder, USA – 14.566

  7. Rhys McClenaghan, Ireland -13.100

  8. Sun Wei, China – 13.066


Women’s vault: Andrade continues to wow, and Skinner’s unlikely Olympic medal

One week ago, MyKayla Skinner thought that her Olympic competition had ended in the qualification round. Sunday, she stood on an Olympic podium, a silver medalist on vault.

With defending Olympic vault champion Simone Biles — whose withdrawal placed Skinner into the event — loudly cheering her on from the stands, Skinner opened the meet with a clean Cheng. It was her best vault of the Games and earned a 15.033, a higher score than either of her vaults during qualifying. On her second vault, an Amanar, Skinner took a slight hop to the left on her landing but kept her feet in bounds, good enough for a 14.8 and an overall score of 14.916.

Brazilian Rebeca Andrade, coming off her silver-medal performance in the all-around, competed two gymnasts later with the same vaults and more amplitude, besting Skinner by a little over a 10th of a point and ultimately edging her for gold. Brazil had never won an Olympic medal in women’s gymnastics until earlier this week, and now Andrade has won two.

Unlike in qualifying and team competition, gymnasts are not provided with what is known as a “one-touch warm-up” or a last-minute opportunity to warm up on the competition apparatus immediately before they compete. That rule has been highly debated, as the conversation at these Games has centered around athlete health and safety, especially in gymnastics.

On American Jade Carey’s first vault, she misstepped on the runway as she approached the springboard and somehow had the wherewithal to throw just a tuck off the table. She saved her body from injury, but the mistake ended her night. Immediately, gymnastics fans took to Twitter to call for #onetouchfinals. Impressively, though, Carey regrouped, went back to the start of the runway and performed a beautiful Amanar. Her dad, Brian, who is also her coach, hugged her tightly and consoled her after her turn.

Korean gymnast Yeo Seo-jeong performed a vault named for her and — 25 years after her father took silver in the event at the 1996 Games — earned the bronze. — Alyssa Roenigk

Final results:

  1. Rebeca Andrade, Brazil – 15.083

  2. MyKayla Skinner, USA – 14.916

  3. Yeo Seo-jeong, Korea – 14.733

  4. Alexa Moreno, Mexico – 14.716

  5. Angelina Melnikova, ROC – 14.683

  6. Liliia Akhaimova, ROC – 14.666

  7. Shallon Olsen, Canada – 13.066

  8. Jade Carey, USA – 12.416


Men’s floor exercise: History for Israel

In the first of four gymnastics event finals on Sunday at the Ariake Gymnastics Centre, Artem Dolgopyat of Israel won the gold medal on floor.

It was the first medal ever for Israel in gymnastics and is the country’s lone gold medal of the 2020 Olympics thus far, and third medal overall.

Dolgopyat, the 2020 European Champion on the event, had the highest score in qualifying and continued his dominance on Sunday. His mark was tied with Spain’s Rayderley Zapata, but Dolgopyat won the second tiebreak because of a higher difficulty score.

Zapata earned the silver medal, and Ruoteng Xiao of China won the bronze.

Yul Moldauer, the only American in the competition, finished in sixth place out of eight. He stuck all but one of his tumbling passes, but he caught his foot during a flair sequence. — D’Arcy Maine

Final results:

  1. Artem Dolgopyat, Israel – 14.933

  2. Rayderley Zapata, Spain – 14.933

  3. Ruoteng Xiao, China – 14.766

  4. Sunghyun Ryu, South Korea – 14.233

  5. Milad Karimi, Kazakhstan – 14.133

  6. Yul Moldauer, USA – 13.533

  7. Nikita Nagornyy, ROC – 13.066

  8. Hansol Kim, South Korea – 13.066


Let the individual event finals begin

Sunday was the first day of individual event finals, and it was a combination of men’s and women’s events. The top eight highest-scoring gymnasts from qualifying advanced on each event, with a maximum of two per country. The preliminary scores were erased, however. The highest score on Sunday won.

The schedule — hope you had your coffee on hand for this one:

4 a.m. ET: men’s floor
4:45 a.m. ET: women’s vault
5:45 a.m. ET: men’s pommel horse
6:27 a.m. ET: women’s uneven bars


Could you tell us more about the Americans?

Funny you should ask. By this point, you’ve probably heard of Suni Lee. But if you haven’t, you should definitely check out this story on her impressive all-around win. There is also a video of her and her dad doing backflips that we can’t recommend strongly enough.

Jade Carey and MyKayla Skinner both qualified to Tokyo as individual competitors, and both have had wild rides during this Olympics. Skinner thought her Olympic experience was over after the qualifying rounds, while Carey took Biles’ spot in the all-around when Biles withdrew.



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Olympic gymnastics: Simone Biles and Suni Lee to compete on beam in last day of event finals

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On Monday, gymnastics event finals started up again at the Tokyo Olympics with men’s vault and rings and women’s floor. After a stunning floor performance, American Jade Carey became an Olympic champion.

Tuesday morning will mark the last time we get to watch our favorite gymnasts compete at the Tokyo Olympics. The final day of gymnastics event finals promises to be special as Simone Biles makes her return to the competition floor. The 24-year-old withdrew from the women’s team final and other individual events to focus on her mental health upon experiencing the “twisties”.

Biles, who earned a bronze medal in beam at the 2016 Rio Games, joins all-around gold medalist Suni Lee in her quest for one more piece of hardware. Biles was all smiles during the warm-up prior to the balance beam final.

If you’ve been following gymnastics at the Games thus far, you already know the action gets underway incredibly early. You also know we’ll have you covered with live updates throughout:


Biles looks good in warm-ups

All eyes were on Simone Biles during warm-ups ahead of Tuesday’s beam finals. She stretched on the floor before doing several run-throughs of her routine on beam.

Her first turn appeared mainly to get comfortable on the beam, and she spent much of the time visualizing and pantomiming various skills and moves. Her second turn, just moments later, was a full routine and there were no outward signs of struggle. She finished with a nearly stuck double-pike dismount.

Biles looked largely at ease, talking and laughing with Suni Lee while not on the beam. The two even watched highlights of other Olympic events on the video board after they had finished warming up on the apparatus.
Biles will be the third competitor on the event tonight, and Lee will be immediately after.


One more time

And just like that, we’re on to the last day of apparatus finals. All-around champions Hashimoto Daiki (Japan) and Suni Lee (USA) are back in action as titles will be decided on parallel bars, balance beam, and horizontal bar. Not to take away from American men’s gymnasts Sam Mikulak (parallel bars) and Brody Malone (horizontal bar), but all eyes will be on the last event of the women’s individual finals, because Simone Biles is back. The GOAT joins newly minted gold medalist Suni Lee in representing for Team USA on the beam.

Beam is the lone apparatus where past results haunt Biles. Despite being the reigning world champion on beam, it was the only event of Rio 2016 in which the four-time Olympic gold medalist made a real mistake (she still won the bronze).

As for Lee, she was third in qualification behind specialist Guan Chenchen (China) and Tang Xijing (China), who represent a country still searching for its first women’s individual medal of these Games. China’s only gold on balance beam to date was won by Deng Linlin at London 2012.

The schedule:

4 a.m. ET: Men’s parallel bars
4:50 a.m. ET: Women’s beam
5:39 a.m. ET: Men’s high bar


Shin ekes out gold, with superhuman vaulting on display across the board

The competition was full of mind-boggling vaults, but in the end, South Korea’s Shin Jeahwan edged ROC team’s Denis Abliazin for the gold medal. Though the two tied in average score, Shin won the tiebreak because he had the highest single score on a vault (a 14.833 for his front handspring 2Β½ twist vs. Abliazin’s 14.800 for his Tsukahara double pike).

Armenia’s Artur Davtyan won the first Olympic medal in gymnastics for his country with a bronze and a 14.733 average. Turkey’s Adem Asil threw a jaw-dropping front handspring double pike half to earn a 15.266, the highest score of any vault in any round of the Olympics. But he put his hands down on his second vault, a Tsukahara double pike, and ended up sixth. — Amy Van Deusen

Final results:

  1. Shin Jeahwan, Korea – 14.783

  2. Denis Abliazin, ROC – 14.783

  3. Artur Davtyan, Armenia – 14.733

  4. Carlos Edriel Yulo, Philippines – 14.716

  5. Nikita Nagornyy, ROC – 14.716

  6. Adem Asil, Turkey – 14.449

  7. Ahmet Onder, Turkey – 14.066

  8. Caio Souza, Brazil – 13.683


Carey gets her redemption on floor

American Jade Carey entered the floor final as a gold-medal favorite and she delivered, competing a beautiful laid out double-double first pass, then rocking her tucked double-double and full-twisting double layout as well. With the highest difficulty of the day (four-tenths of a point higher than any other competitor) she competed second and her score held for the rest of the meet.

Thirty-year-old Italian Vanessa Ferrari stuck her first two passes — a tucked double-double and a whip to immediate full-in — absolutely cold, and drew everyone in with her expressive dance. The 2006 world all-around champion earned a 14.200 for the silver.

Japan’s Mai Murakami and the ROC team’s Angelina Melnikova tied for bronze, both with powerful double layouts as their second pass. Melnikova mounted with a gorgeous full-twisting double layout, while Murakami threw a nice tucked double-double. Their matching difficulty and execution scores earned them both the bronze with no tiebreak. — Amy Van Deusen

1. Jade Carey, USA – 14.366
2. Vanessa Ferrari, Italy – 14.200
3. Mai Murakami, Japan – 14.166 | Angelina Melnikova, ROC – 14.166
5. Rebeca Andrade, Brazil – 14.033
6. Jessica Gadirova, Great Britain – 14.000
7. Jennifer Gadirova, Great Britain – 13.233
8. Viktoriia Listunova, ROC – 12.400


Breaking news: Biles on beam!


Chinese men dominate on rings

It was a 1-2 finish for China in the first gymnastics final of the day Monday. Liu Yang took home the gold in rings and You Hao finished with the silver. The duo, who competed back to back, held up a Chinese flag and posed together for photos once the final scores were revealed.

It was the first gold medal for China in artistic gymnastics during the 2020 Games.

Yang, who was the 2014 world champion in the event, took a small hop on the landing of his double-twisting double-tuck dismount landing, but otherwise was nearly flawless and earned a 15.500. Hao finished 0.2 behind with a 15.300.

Greece’s Eleftherios Petrounias earned the bronze. — D’Arcy Maine

Final results:

  1. Liu Yang, China – 15.500

  2. You Hao, China – 15.300

  3. Eleftherios Petrounias, Greece – 15.200

  4. Samir Ait Said, France – 14.900

  5. Ibrahim Colak, Turkey – 14.866

  6. Denis Abliazin, ROC – 14.833

  7. Adem Asil, Turkey – 14.600

  8. Arthur Zanetti, Brazil – 14.133



Next up: Vault, floor and rings

Monday was the second day of individual event finals, and it was a combination of men’s and women’s events again: men’s rings, women’s floor and men’s vault. The top eight highest-scoring gymnasts from qualifying advanced on each event, with a maximum of two from any one country. The scores didn’t carry over, however — the highest score Monday was crowned Olympic champ.

The schedule:

4 a.m. ET: Men’s rings
4:45 a.m. ET: Women’s floor
5:54 a.m. ET: Men’s vault


Women’s uneven bars: Derwael wins gold; Lee hangs on for bronze

Two-time world champion Nina Derwael, the top qualifier entering the finals, performed her highly difficult, jam-packed routine well to win the event easily for Belgium. She earned a 15.200 score — and her country’s first Olympic gymnastics gold medal in history. The ROC team’s Anastasiia Iliankova hit her routine cleanly for the silver medal — and American Suni Lee held on for bronze.

Olympic all-around gold medalist Lee was first in the lineup and was a little off from the start, missing the connections on her release moves in more than one section of her routine. Though her quick thinking throughout helped her avoid disaster, it affected her difficulty score. Lee earned a 14.500, seven-tenths of a point lower than her qualifying score.

It appeared several of the gymnasts, Lee included, might have been affected by the reportedly cold arena and lack of a one-touch warm-up. All-around bronze medalist Angelina Melnikova (ROC) couldn’t get over on a pirouette and had to hop off, while China’s Fan Yilin — the 2015 and 2017 world champion on bars — fell on her dismount. — Amy Van Deusen

Former Olympians took to Twitter to express their concern over the temperature and lack of one-touch warm-up ahead of events:

Final results:

  1. Nina Derwael, Belgium – 15.200

  2. Anastasiia Iliankova, ROC – 14.833

  3. Suni Lee, USA – 14.500

  4. Lu Yufei, China – 14.400

  5. Elisabeth Seitz, Germany – 14.400

  6. Melanie de Jesus dos Santos, France – 14.033

  7. Fan Yilin, China – 13.900

  8. Angelina Melnikova, ROC – 13.066


Men’s pommel horse: Whitlock retains title

In the final men’s event of the day, Max Whitlock of Great Britain, a three-time Olympian, repeated as pommel horse champion.

Competing in the tough opening spot, Whitlock’s routine featured the highest start value in the meet, a 7.0, which was two-tenths higher than any of his competitors. And it was clean. He also earned the second-highest execution score of the night. His 15.583 set a tough bar for the next seven men to clear.

Lee Chih Kai of Chinese Taipei finished in the silver-medal spot and Japan’s Kazuma Kaya earned bronze.

American Alec Yoder, who competed second, was off from the start of his routine. He had a major form break immediately in his routine and seemed to lose focus afterward. His 14.666 was enough to hold him in medal contention until Lee competed. He finished sixth.

Rhys McClenaghan, who earned attention as the funniest gymnast in Tokyo after posting about the “anti-sex beds” in the athletes village, was the first Irish gymnast to make an Olympic final. Unfortunately, he had difficulty throughout his routine and fell from the apparatus. He finished seventh. — Alyssa Roenigk

Final results:

  1. Max Whitlock, Great Britain – 15.583

  2. Lee Chih-kai, Chinese Taipei – 15.400

  3. Kazuma Kaya, Japan – 14.900

  4. David Belyavskiy, ROC – 14.833

  5. Kohei Kameyama, Japan – 14.600

  6. Alec Yoder, USA – 14.566

  7. Rhys McClenaghan, Ireland -13.100

  8. Sun Wei, China – 13.066


Women’s vault: Andrade continues to wow, and Skinner’s unlikely Olympic medal

One week ago, MyKayla Skinner thought that her Olympic competition had ended in the qualification round. Sunday, she stood on an Olympic podium, a silver medalist on vault.

With defending Olympic vault champion Simone Biles — whose withdrawal placed Skinner into the event — loudly cheering her on from the stands, Skinner opened the meet with a clean Cheng. It was her best vault of the Games and earned a 15.033, a higher score than either of her vaults during qualifying. On her second vault, an Amanar, Skinner took a slight hop to the left on her landing but kept her feet in bounds, good enough for a 14.8 and an overall score of 14.916.

Brazilian Rebeca Andrade, coming off her silver-medal performance in the all-around, competed two gymnasts later with the same vaults and more amplitude, besting Skinner by a little over a 10th of a point and ultimately edging her for gold. Brazil had never won an Olympic medal in women’s gymnastics until earlier this week, and now Andrade has won two.

Unlike in qualifying and team competition, gymnasts are not provided with what is known as a “one-touch warm-up” or a last-minute opportunity to warm up on the competition apparatus immediately before they compete. That rule has been highly debated, as the conversation at these Games has centered around athlete health and safety, especially in gymnastics.

On American Jade Carey’s first vault, she misstepped on the runway as she approached the springboard and somehow had the wherewithal to throw just a tuck off the table. She saved her body from injury, but the mistake ended her night. Immediately, gymnastics fans took to Twitter to call for #onetouchfinals. Impressively, though, Carey regrouped, went back to the start of the runway and performed a beautiful Amanar. Her dad, Brian, who is also her coach, hugged her tightly and consoled her after her turn.

Korean gymnast Yeo Seo-jeong performed a vault named for her and — 25 years after her father took silver in the event at the 1996 Games — earned the bronze. — Alyssa Roenigk

Final results:

  1. Rebeca Andrade, Brazil – 15.083

  2. MyKayla Skinner, USA – 14.916

  3. Yeo Seo-jeong, Korea – 14.733

  4. Alexa Moreno, Mexico – 14.716

  5. Angelina Melnikova, ROC – 14.683

  6. Liliia Akhaimova, ROC – 14.666

  7. Shallon Olsen, Canada – 13.066

  8. Jade Carey, USA – 12.416


Men’s floor exercise: History for Israel

In the first of four gymnastics event finals on Sunday at the Ariake Gymnastics Centre, Artem Dolgopyat of Israel won the gold medal on floor.

It was the first medal ever for Israel in gymnastics and is the country’s lone gold medal of the 2020 Olympics thus far, and third medal overall.

Dolgopyat, the 2020 European Champion on the event, had the highest score in qualifying and continued his dominance on Sunday. His mark was tied with Spain’s Rayderley Zapata, but Dolgopyat won the second tiebreak because of a higher difficulty score.

Zapata earned the silver medal, and Ruoteng Xiao of China won the bronze.

Yul Moldauer, the only American in the competition, finished in sixth place out of eight. He stuck all but one of his tumbling passes, but he caught his foot during a flair sequence. — D’Arcy Maine

Final results:

  1. Artem Dolgopyat, Israel – 14.933

  2. Rayderley Zapata, Spain – 14.933

  3. Ruoteng Xiao, China – 14.766

  4. Sunghyun Ryu, South Korea – 14.233

  5. Milad Karimi, Kazakhstan – 14.133

  6. Yul Moldauer, USA – 13.533

  7. Nikita Nagornyy, ROC – 13.066

  8. Hansol Kim, South Korea – 13.066


Let the individual event finals begin

Sunday was the first day of individual event finals, and it was a combination of men’s and women’s events. The top eight highest-scoring gymnasts from qualifying advanced on each event, with a maximum of two per country. The preliminary scores were erased, however. The highest score on Sunday won.

The schedule — hope you had your coffee on hand for this one:

4 a.m. ET: men’s floor
4:45 a.m. ET: women’s vault
5:45 a.m. ET: men’s pommel horse
6:27 a.m. ET: women’s uneven bars


Could you tell us more about the Americans?

Funny you should ask. By this point, you’ve probably heard of Suni Lee. But if you haven’t, you should definitely check out this story on her impressive all-around win. There is also a video of her and her dad doing backflips that we can’t recommend strongly enough.

Jade Carey and MyKayla Skinner both qualified to Tokyo as individual competitors, and both have had wild rides during this Olympics. Skinner thought her Olympic experience was over after the qualifying rounds, while Carey took Biles’ spot in the all-around when Biles withdrew.



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Olympic gymnastics: Simone Biles and Suni Lee to compete on beam in final day of individual finals

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On Monday, gymnastics event finals started up again at the Tokyo Olympics with men’s vault and rings and women’s floor. After a stunning floor performance, American Jade Carey became an Olympic champion.

Tuesday morning will mark the last time we get to watch our favorite gymnasts compete at the Tokyo Olympics. The final day of gymnastics event finals promises to be special as Simone Biles makes her return to the competition floor. The 24-year-old withdrew from the women’s team final and other individual events to focus on her mental health upon experiencing the “twisties”.

Biles, who earned a bronze medal in beam at the 2016 Rio Games, joins all-around gold medalist Suni Lee in her quest for one more piece of hardware.

If you’ve been following gymnastics at the Games thus far, you already know the action gets underway incredibly early. You also know we’ll have you covered with live updates throughout:


One more time

And just like that, we’re on to the last day of apparatus finals. All-around champions Hashimoto Daiki (Japan) and Suni Lee (USA) are back in action as titles will be decided on parallel bars, balance beam, and horizontal bar. Not to take away from American men’s gymnasts Sam Mikulak (parallel bars) and Brody Malone (horizontal bar), but all eyes will be on the last event of the women’s individual finals, because Simone Biles is back. The GOAT joins newly minted gold medalist Suni Lee in representing for Team USA on the beam.

Beam is the lone apparatus where past results haunt Biles. Despite being the reigning world champion on beam, it was the only event of Rio 2016 in which the four-time Olympic gold medalist made a real mistake (she still won the bronze).

As for Lee, she was third in qualification behind specialist Guan Chenchen (China) and Tang Xijing (China), who represent a country still searching for its first women’s individual medal of these Games. China’s only gold on balance beam to date was won by Deng Linlin at London 2012.

The schedule:

4 a.m. ET: Men’s parallel bars
4:50 a.m. ET: Women’s beam
5:39 a.m. ET: Men’s high bar


Shin ekes out gold, with superhuman vaulting on display across the board

The competition was full of mind-boggling vaults, but in the end, South Korea’s Shin Jeahwan edged ROC team’s Denis Abliazin for the gold medal. Though the two tied in average score, Shin won the tiebreak because he had the highest single score on a vault (a 14.833 for his front handspring 2Β½ twist vs. Abliazin’s 14.800 for his Tsukahara double pike).

Armenia’s Artur Davtyan won the first Olympic medal in gymnastics for his country with a bronze and a 14.733 average. Turkey’s Adem Asil threw a jaw-dropping front handspring double pike half to earn a 15.266, the highest score of any vault in any round of the Olympics. But he put his hands down on his second vault, a Tsukahara double pike, and ended up sixth. — Amy Van Deusen

Final results:

  1. Shin Jeahwan, Korea – 14.783

  2. Denis Abliazin, ROC – 14.783

  3. Artur Davtyan, Armenia – 14.733

  4. Carlos Edriel Yulo, Philippines – 14.716

  5. Nikita Nagornyy, ROC – 14.716

  6. Adem Asil, Turkey – 14.449

  7. Ahmet Onder, Turkey – 14.066

  8. Caio Souza, Brazil – 13.683


Carey gets her redemption on floor

American Jade Carey entered the floor final as a gold-medal favorite and she delivered, competing a beautiful laid out double-double first pass, then rocking her tucked double-double and full-twisting double layout as well. With the highest difficulty of the day (four-tenths of a point higher than any other competitor) she competed second and her score held for the rest of the meet.

Thirty-year-old Italian Vanessa Ferrari stuck her first two passes — a tucked double-double and a whip to immediate full-in — absolutely cold, and drew everyone in with her expressive dance. The 2006 world all-around champion earned a 14.200 for the silver.

Japan’s Mai Murakami and the ROC team’s Angelina Melnikova tied for bronze, both with powerful double layouts as their second pass. Melnikova mounted with a gorgeous full-twisting double layout, while Murakami threw a nice tucked double-double. Their matching difficulty and execution scores earned them both the bronze with no tiebreak. — Amy Van Deusen

1. Jade Carey, USA – 14.366
2. Vanessa Ferrari, Italy – 14.200
3. Mai Murakami, Japan – 14.166 | Angelina Melnikova, ROC – 14.166
5. Rebeca Andrade, Brazil – 14.033
6. Jessica Gadirova, Great Britain – 14.000
7. Jennifer Gadirova, Great Britain – 13.233
8. Viktoriia Listunova, ROC – 12.400


Breaking news: Biles on beam!


Chinese men dominate on rings

It was a 1-2 finish for China in the first gymnastics final of the day Monday. Liu Yang took home the gold in rings and You Hao finished with the silver. The duo, who competed back to back, held up a Chinese flag and posed together for photos once the final scores were revealed.

It was the first gold medal for China in artistic gymnastics during the 2020 Games.

Yang, who was the 2014 world champion in the event, took a small hop on the landing of his double-twisting double-tuck dismount landing, but otherwise was nearly flawless and earned a 15.500. Hao finished 0.2 behind with a 15.300.

Greece’s Eleftherios Petrounias earned the bronze. — D’Arcy Maine

Final results:

  1. Liu Yang, China – 15.500

  2. You Hao, China – 15.300

  3. Eleftherios Petrounias, Greece – 15.200

  4. Samir Ait Said, France – 14.900

  5. Ibrahim Colak, Turkey – 14.866

  6. Denis Abliazin, ROC – 14.833

  7. Adem Asil, Turkey – 14.600

  8. Arthur Zanetti, Brazil – 14.133



Next up: Vault, floor and rings

Monday was the second day of individual event finals, and it was a combination of men’s and women’s events again: men’s rings, women’s floor and men’s vault. The top eight highest-scoring gymnasts from qualifying advanced on each event, with a maximum of two from any one country. The scores didn’t carry over, however — the highest score Monday was crowned Olympic champ.

The schedule:

4 a.m. ET: Men’s rings
4:45 a.m. ET: Women’s floor
5:54 a.m. ET: Men’s vault


Women’s uneven bars: Derwael wins gold; Lee hangs on for bronze

Two-time world champion Nina Derwael, the top qualifier entering the finals, performed her highly difficult, jam-packed routine well to win the event easily for Belgium. She earned a 15.200 score — and her country’s first Olympic gymnastics gold medal in history. The ROC team’s Anastasiia Iliankova hit her routine cleanly for the silver medal — and American Suni Lee held on for bronze.

Olympic all-around gold medalist Lee was first in the lineup and was a little off from the start, missing the connections on her release moves in more than one section of her routine. Though her quick thinking throughout helped her avoid disaster, it affected her difficulty score. Lee earned a 14.500, seven-tenths of a point lower than her qualifying score.

It appeared several of the gymnasts, Lee included, might have been affected by the reportedly cold arena and lack of a one-touch warm-up. All-around bronze medalist Angelina Melnikova (ROC) couldn’t get over on a pirouette and had to hop off, while China’s Fan Yilin — the 2015 and 2017 world champion on bars — fell on her dismount. — Amy Van Deusen

Former Olympians took to Twitter to express their concern over the temperature and lack of one-touch warm-up ahead of events:

Final results:

  1. Nina Derwael, Belgium – 15.200

  2. Anastasiia Iliankova, ROC – 14.833

  3. Suni Lee, USA – 14.500

  4. Lu Yufei, China – 14.400

  5. Elisabeth Seitz, Germany – 14.400

  6. Melanie de Jesus dos Santos, France – 14.033

  7. Fan Yilin, China – 13.900

  8. Angelina Melnikova, ROC – 13.066


Men’s pommel horse: Whitlock retains title

In the final men’s event of the day, Max Whitlock of Great Britain, a three-time Olympian, repeated as pommel horse champion.

Competing in the tough opening spot, Whitlock’s routine featured the highest start value in the meet, a 7.0, which was two-tenths higher than any of his competitors. And it was clean. He also earned the second-highest execution score of the night. His 15.583 set a tough bar for the next seven men to clear.

Lee Chih Kai of Chinese Taipei finished in the silver-medal spot and Japan’s Kazuma Kaya earned bronze.

American Alec Yoder, who competed second, was off from the start of his routine. He had a major form break immediately in his routine and seemed to lose focus afterward. His 14.666 was enough to hold him in medal contention until Lee competed. He finished sixth.

Rhys McClenaghan, who earned attention as the funniest gymnast in Tokyo after posting about the “anti-sex beds” in the athletes village, was the first Irish gymnast to make an Olympic final. Unfortunately, he had difficulty throughout his routine and fell from the apparatus. He finished seventh. — Alyssa Roenigk

Final results:

  1. Max Whitlock, Great Britain – 15.583

  2. Lee Chih-kai, Chinese Taipei – 15.400

  3. Kazuma Kaya, Japan – 14.900

  4. David Belyavskiy, ROC – 14.833

  5. Kohei Kameyama, Japan – 14.600

  6. Alec Yoder, USA – 14.566

  7. Rhys McClenaghan, Ireland -13.100

  8. Sun Wei, China – 13.066


Women’s vault: Andrade continues to wow, and Skinner’s unlikely Olympic medal

One week ago, MyKayla Skinner thought that her Olympic competition had ended in the qualification round. Sunday, she stood on an Olympic podium, a silver medalist on vault.

With defending Olympic vault champion Simone Biles — whose withdrawal placed Skinner into the event — loudly cheering her on from the stands, Skinner opened the meet with a clean Cheng. It was her best vault of the Games and earned a 15.033, a higher score than either of her vaults during qualifying. On her second vault, an Amanar, Skinner took a slight hop to the left on her landing but kept her feet in bounds, good enough for a 14.8 and an overall score of 14.916.

Brazilian Rebeca Andrade, coming off her silver-medal performance in the all-around, competed two gymnasts later with the same vaults and more amplitude, besting Skinner by a little over a 10th of a point and ultimately edging her for gold. Brazil had never won an Olympic medal in women’s gymnastics until earlier this week, and now Andrade has won two.

Unlike in qualifying and team competition, gymnasts are not provided with what is known as a “one-touch warm-up” or a last-minute opportunity to warm up on the competition apparatus immediately before they compete. That rule has been highly debated, as the conversation at these Games has centered around athlete health and safety, especially in gymnastics.

On American Jade Carey’s first vault, she misstepped on the runway as she approached the springboard and somehow had the wherewithal to throw just a tuck off the table. She saved her body from injury, but the mistake ended her night. Immediately, gymnastics fans took to Twitter to call for #onetouchfinals. Impressively, though, Carey regrouped, went back to the start of the runway and performed a beautiful Amanar. Her dad, Brian, who is also her coach, hugged her tightly and consoled her after her turn.

Korean gymnast Yeo Seo-jeong performed a vault named for her and — 25 years after her father took silver in the event at the 1996 Games — earned the bronze. — Alyssa Roenigk

Final results:

  1. Rebeca Andrade, Brazil – 15.083

  2. MyKayla Skinner, USA – 14.916

  3. Yeo Seo-jeong, Korea – 14.733

  4. Alexa Moreno, Mexico – 14.716

  5. Angelina Melnikova, ROC – 14.683

  6. Liliia Akhaimova, ROC – 14.666

  7. Shallon Olsen, Canada – 13.066

  8. Jade Carey, USA – 12.416


Men’s floor exercise: History for Israel

In the first of four gymnastics event finals on Sunday at the Ariake Gymnastics Centre, Artem Dolgopyat of Israel won the gold medal on floor.

It was the first medal ever for Israel in gymnastics and is the country’s lone gold medal of the 2020 Olympics thus far, and third medal overall.

Dolgopyat, the 2020 European Champion on the event, had the highest score in qualifying and continued his dominance on Sunday. His mark was tied with Spain’s Rayderley Zapata, but Dolgopyat won the second tiebreak because of a higher difficulty score.

Zapata earned the silver medal, and Ruoteng Xiao of China won the bronze.

Yul Moldauer, the only American in the competition, finished in sixth place out of eight. He stuck all but one of his tumbling passes, but he caught his foot during a flair sequence. — D’Arcy Maine

Final results:

  1. Artem Dolgopyat, Israel – 14.933

  2. Rayderley Zapata, Spain – 14.933

  3. Ruoteng Xiao, China – 14.766

  4. Sunghyun Ryu, South Korea – 14.233

  5. Milad Karimi, Kazakhstan – 14.133

  6. Yul Moldauer, USA – 13.533

  7. Nikita Nagornyy, ROC – 13.066

  8. Hansol Kim, South Korea – 13.066


Let the individual event finals begin

Sunday was the first day of individual event finals, and it was a combination of men’s and women’s events. The top eight highest-scoring gymnasts from qualifying advanced on each event, with a maximum of two per country. The preliminary scores were erased, however. The highest score on Sunday won.

The schedule — hope you had your coffee on hand for this one:

4 a.m. ET: men’s floor
4:45 a.m. ET: women’s vault
5:45 a.m. ET: men’s pommel horse
6:27 a.m. ET: women’s uneven bars


Could you tell us more about the Americans?

Funny you should ask. By this point, you’ve probably heard of Suni Lee. But if you haven’t, you should definitely check out this story on her impressive all-around win. There is also a video of her and her dad doing backflips that we can’t recommend strongly enough.

Jade Carey and MyKayla Skinner both qualified to Tokyo as individual competitors, and both have had wild rides during this Olympics. Skinner thought her Olympic experience was over after the qualifying rounds, while Carey took Biles’ spot in the all-around when Biles withdrew.



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